Love in an Undead Age (by A.M. Geever)

Zombies / Dystopian

It’s not always easy to define zombie books.
At one end they are a sub-genre of Horror, but they can also be a sub-genre of Romance and even humour.
I’ve always had a basic model of what a zombie book is, based on a bunch of recurring themes and archetypes.
There are of course brain eating undead.
They usually come from the south. There is a plucky band of survivors. A Walmart. A fort. I could go on but you get the idea.
I guess those things are the rules of the genre.

Authors love breaking rules but I haven’t read a zombie book that has broken this many of them.

First of all Love in an Undead Age is set years after the zombie apocalypse. There is a vaccine and that vaccine is controlled by the City Council. Surviving infection is all about getting vaccinated but the council are anything but benevolent.

In something of a cold war with the council is the Jesuit priests. They don’t have the vaccine but control much of the food. They also have an audacious plan to make the vaccine available to all.

And there you have the basic premise.


I loved this book if for no other reason than it is so different from everything else. It’s not an easy book. It’s quite dense and the set-up was tough going but when it clicks into gear it’s a runaway train.

Many thanks to the author who provided me with this review copy.  

Storm of Locusts (by Rebecca Roanhorse)

Dystopia / Urban Fantasy

When the waters rose gods and monsters were set free and once again walk amongst us. Maggie is a Navajo monster hunter, the God Killer. She killed coyote and trapped Neizghani (Book 1: Trail of Lightning), now a new threat has emerged. A cult led the elusive White Locust has kidnapped two of her friends and Maggie is determined to rescue them.


Occasionally a writer comes along who changes everything in a genre.
They make you excited again.
It’s like everything is right with the world.

Mark Henwick is one of those authors. He took an old idea and made it exciting and surprising again.
And Rebecca Roanhorse is one of those authors as well.

She takes themes I’ve read before. Things I’ve seen dozens of times. But she saturates them with authenticity and somehow makes them original. I wish I knew more about the myths and lore of the Diné –– I don’t but this book feels right, it feels respectful of the Navajo people and their traditions, and I love it for that.

But it’s much more than that.  It’s a book that will suck you in and entertain you until the very last page.