Love in an Undead Age (by A.M. Geever)

Zombies / Dystopian

It’s not always easy to define zombie books.
At one end they are a sub-genre of Horror, but they can also be a sub-genre of Romance and even humour.
I’ve always had a basic model of what a zombie book is, based on a bunch of recurring themes and archetypes.
There are of course brain eating undead.
They usually come from the south. There is a plucky band of survivors. A Walmart. A fort. I could go on but you get the idea.
I guess those things are the rules of the genre.

Authors love breaking rules but I haven’t read a zombie book that has broken this many of them.

First of all Love in an Undead Age is set years after the zombie apocalypse. There is a vaccine and that vaccine is controlled by the City Council. Surviving infection is all about getting vaccinated but the council are anything but benevolent.

In something of a cold war with the council is the Jesuit priests. They don’t have the vaccine but control much of the food. They also have an audacious plan to make the vaccine available to all.

And there you have the basic premise.


I loved this book if for no other reason than it is so different from everything else. It’s not an easy book. It’s quite dense and the set-up was tough going but when it clicks into gear it’s a runaway train.

Many thanks to the author who provided me with this review copy.  

Instauration (by Sarah Lyons Fleming)

Post-Apocalyptic / Zombies

Instauration is book 3 in the City Series. For the best reading experience, read Mordacious and Peripeteia first.

After Walt and his gang attacked the Sunset Park Safe Zone (book 2 Peripeteia) Sylvie, Eric and the other survivors find themselves on the run.  They take refuge in the Stuyvesant Town Safe Zone where they plan their revenge on Walt.  But things are anything but safe in the city and zombies aren’t even the worst of it. Sylvie and her friends are assailed on all sides by psychopaths who think nothing of murdering and raping to get ahead.


Most zombie books are fluff. They are basically comics and you can’t take them too seriously. That’s not the case with Instauration. It’s brutal, uncomfortable and hard to read in parts.

You desperately want all the people you have come to love over the three books to get their happy ending. Not all of them will.

Until the End of the World / And After (by Sarah Lyons Fleming)

Zombie Apocalypse 

I’ve read a few zombie novels, and this is one of them.

Honestly, you could take the synopsis from any of them and switch it seamlessly into any of the others. Pretty much the same things happen in them all.

So quickly…there’s a virus, looters, they escape the city. Head to the farm, meet some bad guys, get over-run by zombies. Make their way to a fort, go to walmart, get over-run by a tsunami of zombies. Head into the wilderness. As expected along the way there is a lot of crunching, squishing and exploding brains. A few loved characters bite the bullet but a motley group
manage to escape and drive off into the sunset.

Maybe I read too much into these books but I grew up when people routinely talked about being “over-run” by immigrants of one persuasion or another. This book has the tsunami of zombies coming from the south…err Mexico, and when I read that sort of stuff I cringe a little. I don’t think it’s deliberate but it’s overt enough that I always notice it and draw those parallels.

That said, the books are entertaining enough even if they’re not all that original.

Note:  These two books work well together.  You could read them and walk away without any trouble.  That said, there is a third book coming out in early 2015.  

Screen Shot 2014-11-09 at 3.09.42 pmYellow, Orange, Red –– what it means: http://wp.me/P2B7b5-9l